Categories
Job Offer

How to Write an Email Response to a Job Offer like a Pro

After a series of building a winning resume, filling out applications, sending them to recruiters, and meeting employers for a job interview, you finally have a job offer. Congrats! Pat yourself on the back for all your hard work. Now it’s time to write an email response.

But, another challenge awaits you: whether to accept or decline the offer. It’s tricky as you don’t want to burn bridges if you want to back out.

Whatever you decide, it’s always essential to respond to the job offer with gracious respect and professionalism. Here, we explain how to write an email response to a job offer to help you compose your own. But first…

What is a job offer?

A job offer is an official letter from the employer to invite you to work for their company. It’s the final stage in the hiring process where they’ll explain your tasks or work hours in detail. Below are what a job offer includes, in general:

  • Job title
  • Job description and responsibilities
  • Employment classification
  • Starting date of employment
  • Salary
  • Signing bonus
  • Work schedule and location
  • Contact details
  • Benefits information and eligibility
  • Employment agreements
  • Acknowledgment of offer and confirmation of acceptance

Accept, decline, negotiate, or ask for more time?

Whether you plan to accept, reject, negotiate, or ask for more time to think about the offer, you must respond to the email with the same courtesy as you did during the interview. 

It’s always important to be professional with your email response to the job offer. There’s a high chance that you will bump into the hiring manager in the future as you likely belong in the same industry, so be respectful. 

Land Jobs Faster With Out Resume Builder

Here are some notes we can give you on how to reply to the job offer email perfectly.

1. Accepting the offer

When you’ve been dreaming of working in a company and are finally offered a position, it can be hard to resist sending your confirmation immediately. 

No matter how long you dreamt of working in that company, it’s still best to confirm that the job title and other benefits check out to what you need. If it does, then hurry! Send out your resounding Yes!

Here’s what you need to include in your response:

  • Greet them
  • Express your gratitude
  • State the position
  • Reiterate the salary and the compensation benefits
  • Inquire for additional documents
  • Confirm your attendance at their expected start date

Here’s a sample email for your reference:

Dear Ms. Grey,

Good day!

I am delighted to accept the position of Digital Marketing Associate at Okato Advertising. I am excited to finally start working and provide my contribution to the organization.

As we discussed, my base salary will be $52,000 and you will provide me with health and life insurance after 90 days of employment.

Please let me know the documents that I need to prepare before my starting date, February 04, 2022.

Thank you very much for the opportunity.

Best Regards,

Abbison Shepherd

2. Extending the acceptance date

Sometimes, we look for a job to advance our professional careers even when we are not physically or mentally ready to work. Whatever reason you have, you still need to get back to the employer.

If you still need to weigh your options or check if the job is the right fit for you, ask for more time.

Make sure to respond to their email within 24 hours. Ask for more time if you:

  • Have a gut feeling telling you that you should hold off on taking the role
  • Have intimate reasons that contribute to the choice
  • Need to evaluate the situation, especially if the job requires you for a relocation
  • Are considering other job offers

Do I need to tell them my reasons for wanting to think about the offer?

No. You don’t need to give the recruiters the exact reason. You can state your explanation in a general way, but remember to keep your manners intact when asking for an extension.

How much time should I ask before giving my answer?

As a general rule of thumb, you need to respond to the offer within a week. But, some companies may also be in a hurry to fill that position. If you can, ask for at least 2 to 3 days. 

How should I write my response?

When asking for more time to decide to sign for the position, express your gratitude for the offer, inquire about the deadline, and ask for more time. You can also ask questions about the proposal if you have. 

Take a peep at this email sample on how to write the email:

Dear Mr. O’Malley,

Good day!

Thank you for the offer to work at Apsoft as a Junior Architect. I am flattered for the time and effort you provided to get to know me and my professional background.

I look forward to bringing my skills to the organization while expanding my knowledge and career growth. If it’s possible, can I ask for a few days to review the job offer?

I remain honored to be considered for the position, and I want to make sure that I understand the offer in its entirety. Thank you again for considering me for the job.

Best,

Arizonia Torres

3. Negotiating the offer

Asking your future boss to increase your salary or adjust the compensation benefits is rarely easy. You need to tie confidence and humility together. 

If you found your brows furrowed on how to do this, explore the rules below to win the discussion:

Be likable

Never look down on the power of likability. You need to know how to manage inevitable tensions in negotiations, like asking for what you deserve without sounding greedy or being persistent without looking petty. Always bridge the gap between confidence and politeness.

Show them you deserve the counteroffer

Help your future bosses understand why you deserve what you are requesting. Here, you need to state the importance of providing you the benefits. Focus on your skills, experience, and the value you can bring to the company. If you have personal reasons, don’t be afraid to state them, but don’t overshare.

Never give ultimatums

No one likes to be demanded, especially when money or resources are at stake. Your counterpart will not only do the same, but they will also think you’re silly and selfish. 

Assure them that they can get you

If you want to bid for better work hours or travel benefits, assure them that you’re willing to work for them should they agree. Often, if you overplay your cards by stating how many companies want to hire you, they’ll think that they won’t get you anyway, so why bother? If you tell them that other corporations are giving better benefits, assure them that you’ll work for them if they give you the incentives you need.

In your email response to the job offer, voice your concerns. Always request a phone or video conference to make things clearer. Also, prepare your counteroffer or what more you can bring to the table in exchange for your requests. 

Delve into this sample email to know how to write it.

Dear Mr. Webber,

Good day!

Thank you for letting me know that I got accepted for the Accounting Specialist position at your organization. I am beyond ecstatic about this opportunity that you’ve given me.

I genuinely believe that my seven years of experience in the accounting field will be a solid asset to the company. It has exposed me to challenges, which cultivated my problem-solving skills. And I am positive that I can apply these skills to my job.

Before I can accept the offer, can we kindly talk about the possibility of letting me take Saturdays off my schedule? I am a single dad, and I have my kid with me during weekends. With that, I’d like to spend more quality time with him.

If you allow my request, I can work additional hours during weekdays to compensate for the time.

Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Sincerely,

Ben Bailey

4. Declining the offer

You are in an enviable yet difficult position. You are finally hired, but you found out that the workplace culture is terrible. Or, you got accepted from other companies with a better offer. Regardless of your reasons, rejecting the employer that decided to give you a chance is crazy hard. 

When you decline a job offer, remember to do it professionally, so you don’t burn bridges or eliminate valuable contacts for the future.

Dear Ms. Yang,

Good day!

Thank you so much for giving me the chance to work as a Social Media Director with ApSoft. I appreciate the offer and your interest in hiring me.

It’s a tough decision, but I will not be accepting your offer as I don’t think it fits with my current career plans. Again, thank you for considering me for the position.

I am cheered by the possibility of working with you in the future. As such, would you be willing to connect with me on LinkedIn so we can keep in touch?

Thanks again,

Shania Ross

Write your email response to the job offer today

Make sure to be professional and appreciative in your email. Refrain from sounding too cold or informal. Regardless of your final decision, be thankful for the opportunity they have given you.

Subscribe to Newsletter

Receive up-to-date news, resume writing ideas, job hunting tips and more from Resume Guy!

Invalid email address
Give it a try. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *